Info

The Story Behind

Do you ever wonder about the history of everyday things in your world? Do you like trivia and fun facts? Have you lost hours to Wikipedia rabbit holes? The Story Behind is the show for you! Trivia nerd Emily Prokop explores the origins and cool stories that surround the things, people and places you may never have wondered about before. Warning: Your friends might tire of you starting sentences with, "I learned on a podcast ..."
RSS Feed Subscribe in iTunes
2017
February
January


2016
December
November
October


Categories

All Episodes
Archives
Categories
Now displaying: Page 1

The extraordinary history of the ordinary. Do you like trivia and fun facts? Have you lost hours to Wikipedia rabbit holes? Do you ever wonder about the history of everyday things in your world?

The Story Behind is the show for you!

About/Contact        Subscribe        Support        Binge-Listen

Feb 20, 2017

In 1994, a movie came along about a man of low intelligence who happens to hit a few lucky breaks, weaving himself in and out of the timeline of American history, and into the hearts of millions of movie-goers. That man was Forrest. Forrest Gump.

For the month of February, I’ll be focusing episode topics on historical and pop culture references in the movie. Ones you may have missed when watching the film because of the overwhelming emotion attached to every scene, or ones you may only be familiar with on the surface.

In this episode, we’ll talk about the $45 drawing that was meant to boost morale in a company, and how that design became so ubiquitous, it’s seen all over the world, including on our phones in the form of emojis.

I’m your host, Emily Prokop, and this is The Story Behind The Smiley Face.

Follow The Story Behind: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website

Check out #PodernFamily on Twitter to find other great indie podcasts like this one.

If you enjoy podcasts about history, literature, archeology, and the arts, check out the hashtag #HumanitiesPodcasts on Twitter to find more podcasts like this one.

Click here to support this podcast on Patreon.

Media:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tOHr85z9k64

Music for Makers

Sources:

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/who-really-invented-the-smiley-face-2058483/

http://www.smileycompany.com/smile/history/

http://www.smiley.com/

http://www.legacy.com/news/culture-and-trends/article/10-things-about-harvey-ball-and-his-famous-smiley-face

Feb 16, 2017

In 1994, a movie came along about a man of low intelligence who happens to hit a few lucky breaks, weaving himself in and out of the timeline of American history, and into the hearts of millions of movie-goers. That man was Forrest. Forrest Gump.

For the month of February, I’ll be focusing episode topics on historical and pop culture references in the movie. Ones you may have missed when watching the film because of the overwhelming emotion attached to every scene, or ones you may only be familiar with on the surface.

In this episode, we’ll be talking about the song that seemed to be inspired when Forrest Gump and John Lennon appeared on the Dick Cavett Show. It was as if you could see the gears turning in Lennon’s head as Forrest explained to him what China was like, and the beginnings of Lennon’s most successful single from his solo career.

I’m your host, Emily Prokop, and this is The Story Behind Imagine.

Follow The Story Behind: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website

Check out #PodernFamily on Twitter to find other great indie podcasts like this one.

If you enjoy podcasts about history, literature, archeology, and the arts, check out the hashtag #HumanitiesPodcasts on Twitter to find more podcasts like this one.

Click here to support this podcast on Patreon.

Media:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SWD8YI1Mqhs 

Music for Makers

Sources:

http://www.biography.com/news/john-lennon-imagine-song-facts

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/lists/the-500-greatest-songs-of-all-time-20110407/john-lennon-imagine-20110516

http://www.rebeatmag.com/9-myths-about-john-lennon-and-the-far-more-interesting-truths/

http://www.biography.com/people/john-lennon-9379045#early-life

http://www.centralparknyc.org/things-to-see-and-do/attractions/strawberry-fields.html?referrer=https://www.google.com/

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2012/jan/03/cee-lo-green-john-lennon

http://www.chestnuthilllocal.com/2012/05/17/john-lennons-imagine-meets-the-dsm/

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/08/12/john-lennon-closing-ceremony-imagine-olympics_n_1770882.html?utm_hp_ref=mostpopular

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imagine_(John_Lennon_song)#Charts_and_certifications

https://secondhandsongs.com/work/5917/versions#nav-entity

https://web.archive.org/web/20121014153533/http://www.theprovince.com/entertainment/Today+Music+History/7345666/story.html

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-396625/John-Lennons-Imagine-banned-school-anti-religious-lyrics.html

http://www.john-lennon.com/imaginebanned.htm

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/719027/Liverpool-Airport-to-be-renamed-after-Lennon.html

Feb 13, 2017

In 1994, a movie came along about a man of low intelligence who happens to hit a few lucky breaks, weaving himself in and out of the timeline of American history, and into the hearts of millions of movie-goers. That man is Forrest. Forrest Gump.

For the month of February, I’ll be focusing episode topics on historical and pop culture references in the movie. Ones you may have missed when watching the film because of the overwhelming emotion attached to every scene, or ones you may only be familiar with on the surface.

In this episode, we’ll be talking about the popular victorian parlor sport and how it led to the first Americans visiting China in 20 years, breaking what was known as the bamboo curtain.

I’m your host, Emily Prokop, and this is The Story Behind Ping-Pong.

The role of Premier Zhou En-lai was played by Fear from Fearcast and FYFCast.

Follow The Story Behind: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website

Check out #PodernFamily on Twitter to find other great indie podcasts like this one.

If you enjoy podcasts about history, literature, archeology, and the arts, check out the hashtag #HumanitiesPodcasts on Twitter to find more podcasts like this one.

Click here to support this podcast on Patreon.

Media:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wvJ4wh1kwR8

Music for Makers

Sources:

https://www.killerspin.com/blog/table-tennis-through-time-a-brief-history-of-ping-pong/

https://www.killerspin.com/the-history-of-table-tennis

http://www.athleticscholarships.net/history-of-table-tennis.htm

https://www.olympic.org/table-tennis-equipment-and-history

http://www.pongworld.com/more/history.shtml

http://www.businessinsider.com/dartmouth-beer-pong-guide-2013-11

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/02/26/drinking-games-beer-pong_n_4855917.html

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/china/peopleevents/pande07.html

http://www.history.com/news/ping-pong-diplomacy

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WUOiJOqrHlI

http://www.avclub.com/article/tom-hanks-had-some-cgi-help-his-forrest-gump-ping--235793

http://articles.latimes.com/1994-07-10/entertainment/ca-14048_1_gary-sinise

https://storify.com/kendrakahn/how-cgi-technology-allowed-forrest-gump-meet-john

Feb 9, 2017

In 1994, a movie came along about a man of low intelligence who happens to hit a few lucky breaks, weaving himself in and out of the timeline of American history, and into the hearts of millions of movie-goers. That man was Forrest. Forrest Gump.

For the month of February, I’ll be focusing episode topics on historical and pop culture references in the movie. Ones you may have missed when watching the film because of the overwhelming emotion attached to every scene, or ones you may only be familiar with on the surface.

In this episode, we’ll be talking about Forrest’s favorite and America’s oldest major soft drink. Beginning as a wellness tonic in a drugstore in Waco, Texas, its flavors are hard to pinpoint, exactly.

I’m your host, Emily Prokop, and this is The Story Behind Dr Pepper.

Follow The Story Behind: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website

Check out #PodernFamily on Twitter to find other great indie podcasts like this one.

If you enjoy podcasts about history, literature, archeology, and the arts, check out the hashtag #HumanitiesPodcasts on Twitter to find more podcasts like this one.

Click here to support this podcast on Patreon.

Media:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JSEdBNslGOk

Music for Makers

Sources:

http://www.drpeppermuseum.com/about-us/history-of-dr--pepper.aspx

http://mentalfloss.com/article/67514/11-things-you-might-not-know-about-dr-pepper

http://www.dmagazine.com/publications/d-magazine/1975/september/dr-pepper-takes-on-coke/

https://www.drpeppersnapplegroup.com/company/history

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/food-and-drink/news/solved-mystery-of-dr-peppers-secret-recipe-1679012.html

http://inventors.about.com/od/famousinventors/fl/The-History-of-Dr-Pepper.htm

http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2010/02/dr-pepper-is-the-oldest-major-soft-drink-in-the-united-states/

https://www.drpeppersnapplegroup.com/company/history

http://theroanoker.com/interests/history/one-year-in-roanoke%3A-1957/

Feb 6, 2017

In 1994, a movie came along about a man of low intelligence who happens to hit a few lucky breaks, weaving himself in and out of the timeline of American history, and into the hearts of millions of movie-goers. That man is Forrest. Forrest Gump.

For the month of February, I’ll be focusing episode topics on historical and pop culture references in the movie. Ones you may have missed when watching the film because of the overwhelming emotion attached to every scene, or ones you may only be familiar with on the surface.

In this episode, we’ll talk about the history behind desegregation of schools, Alabama Governor Wallace and the reasons for his stance, and how this led to the Civil Rights Act of 1964. This episode may not be suitable for all listeners.

I’m your host, Emily Prokop, and this is The Story Behind the Stand in the Schoolhouse Door.

Follow The Story Behind: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website

Check out #PodernFamily on Twitter to find other great indie podcasts like this one.

If you enjoy podcasts about history, literature, archeology, and the arts, check out the hashtag #HumanitiesPodcasts on Twitter to find more podcasts like this one.

Click here to support this podcast on Patreon.

Media:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eluXKOqxM28

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L1rd6xfGg5s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLLDn7MjbF0

Music for Makers

Sources:

http://www.usnews.com/news/blogs/press-past/2013/06/11/george-wallace-stood-in-a-doorway-at-the-university-of-alabama-50-years-ago-today

http://www.archives.alabama.gov/govs_list/schooldoor.html

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/primary-resources/jfk-desegregation/

http://www.history.com/topics/black-history/plessy-v-ferguson

https://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/brown-v-board/timeline.html

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/supremecourt/rights/landmark_brown.html

https://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2012/12/in-southern-towns-segregation-academies-are-still-going-strong/266207/

http://www.encyclopediaofalabama.org/article/h-3421

http://www.history.com/topics/black-history/civil-rights-act

http://www.npr.org/2003/06/11/1294680/wallace-in-the-schoolhouse-door

Feb 2, 2017

In 1994, a story came along about a man of low intelligence who happens to hit a few lucky breaks, weaving himself in and out of the timeline of American history, and into the hearts of millions of movie-goers. That man is Forrest. Forrest Gump.

For the month of February, I’ll be focusing episode topics on historical and pop culture references in the movie. Ones you may have missed when watching the film because of the overwhelming emotion attached to every scene, or ones you may only be familiar with on the surface.

In this episode, we’re starting at the beginning of the movie, with the man Forrest Gump was named after. Some of the content may not be suitable for all listeners.

I’m your host, Emily Prokop, and this is The Story Behind Nathan Bedford Forrest.

The role of General Sherman was played by Mark from the Unskippable podcast and the band And Robots. And Mat from The One Word, Go! Show played the role of Nathan Bedford Forrest.

Follow The Story Behind: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website

Check out #PodernFamily on Twitter to find other great indie podcasts like this one.

If you enjoy podcasts about history, literature, archeology, and the arts, check out the hashtag #HumanitiesPodcasts on Twitter to find more podcasts like this one.

Click here to support this podcast on Patreon.

Media:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=raVFzZZLp3A 

Music for Makers

Sources:

http://www.history.com/topics/american-civil-war/nathan-bedford-forrest

http://www.civilwar.org/education/history/biographies/nathan-bedford-forrest.html?referrer=https://www.google.com/#

http://www.nytimes.com/learning/general/onthisday/bday/0713.html

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045160/1875-07-06/ed-1/seq-1/

https://books.google.com/books?id=0MvlfHVwVNwC&pg=PA474&lpg=PA474&dq=nathan+bedford+forrest+offers+services+to+sherman&source=bl&ots=bCih0lmWwh&sig=OSMtiIFWsrpFQlrT1EVieUXyRvQ&hl=en&sa=X&ei=_AXDU7-0DZSlyASm-IDwBQ&ved=0CEEQ6AEwBQ#v=onepage&q=nathan%20bedford%20forrest%20klan&f=false

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-a-tures/general-nathan-bedford-fo_b_7734444.html

 

 

Jan 30, 2017

This episode was decided by listeners who responded to a poll I put up last week on Twitter asking if I should do a regular show for Episode 30 or if I should do a special episode with 30 random facts. If you’re not already, follow @storybehindpod on TwitterFacebook and Instagram so you can contribute to the show.

What you decided was episode 30 should be 30 random facts, so without further ado, here we go!

I’m your host, Emily Prokop, and this is The Story Behind 30 Random Things.

  • Many things we eat and drink contain grass. Not the kinds that necessarily grow in our yards, but varieties like wheat grass and barley grass are found in beer, whiskey and bread.
  • A way to distinguish a monkey from an ape is their tails. Apes don’t have tails, but monkeys do.
  • Yams commonly found in your grocery store are probably sweet potatoes. True yams grow in Africa and Asia and are relatively tough to find. They are related to the lily family, while sweet potatoes are related to the morning glory family. But grocery stores distinguish sweet potatoes as being a firm sweet potato with a light flesh and a yam as being a soft sweet potato with a more orange or copper color.
  • The moons and natural satellites of Uranis were named for characters in works by William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope, like Ophelia, Juliet, Belinda and Umbriel. The tradition was started by astronomer William Lassell, who discovered the first two in 1851.
    • Cordelia from King Lear
    • Ophelia from Hamlet
    • Bianca from Taming of the Shrew
    • Cressida from Troilus and Cressida
    • Desdemona from Othello
    • Juliet from Romeo and Juliet
    • Portia from Merchant of Venice
    • Rosalind from As You Like It
    • Belinda, Umbriel  from Rape of Lock
    • Puck, Titania and Oberon from A Midsummer Night's Dream
    • Miranda, Ariel, Caliban, Sycorax, Prospero, Setebos, Stephano and Trinculo from The Tempest
  • Hades, from Greek mythology, is not the basis for Satan in Christianity. Hades isn’t necessarily a bad guy -- his job is simply to guard the Underworld, which is where all souls were believed to have gone when they died. There are parts of the Underworld where evil souls are tortured, much like Christianity’s description of Hell, but souls considered good are rewarded in the Underworld.
  • Erasers work by attracting the graphite from pencils off the paper and onto the rubber. Before our modern-day erasers, people would often use balled up bread to fix their mistakes on paper.
  • Raisins were discovered accidentally when a San Fransisco grocer began selling grapes that had been dried out due to the heat wave 1873. He called them a “Peruvian Delicacy.”
  • Eclair is the French word for Lightning. It’s unclear why the cream-filled pastry is named that. One theory is that the name refers to the flaky outside and creamy inside being “light,” and a second theory is that it’s eaten in a flash.
  • Shirley Temple has fought soda companies twice for trying to market the ginger ale and grenadine drink named in her honor. Both times, she won. In 1988 when a California company tried to market Shirley T. Sparkling Soda, she was quoted by the New York Times as saying, “I will fight it like a tigress. All a celebrity has is their name.”
  • If you’ve ever wondered where the phrase “Steal one’s thunder” comes from, it’s from John Dennis, an English dramatist from the 1700s, who invented a device for one of his plays that made a thunder sound. When his play flopped, the theater used the device for another play, causing Dennis to say, “That is my thunder, by God; the villains will play my thunder, but not my play.”
  • “Steal my Sunshine,” the poppy ‘90s favorite by the brother-sister band Len isn’t actually as positive as the title implies. It’s been said the lyrics either refer to drugs or depression and how someone can make you feel worse by stealing your sunshine.
  • The word “sychophant,” which basically means a self-serving suck up, has two possible origins. Both are pretty great.
    • The first is that it comes from the Greek words “suko,” which means Fig, and “phantes,” which means people who reveal something. Back then, those who exported figs were doing so illegally, and anyone who told on them to authorities was called a Fig Revealer, or Suko-Phant. But the Oxford English Dictionary acknowledges this origin story to be unsubstantiated.
    • The second origin comes from the Greek “sykophantes”, the Latin “sycophanta” and the Middle French version, “sycophante” in the 1530s, which also has to do with figs. In ancient Greece, it was a vulgar gesture to stick ones thumb between two fingers, which was thought to resemble a fig. It doesn’t sound too bad until you find out that a fig was symbolic of a certain lady part. This gesture was commonly used as a taunt in Greek sporting events.
  • Antarctica is the world’s largest desert. Hard to believe, right? But a desert is actually defined not by sand or heat, but by the amount of precipitation it receives, and Antarctica only gets an average of 2 inches of snow per year.
  • New words are added to English language at a rate of one new word every two hours.
  • Coca-Cola bottles were designed when the company sponsored a competition to design distinctive bottles. At the time, all beverages were put in similar bottles, making it difficult to making it difficult to distinguish one drink from the other when kept cool in a bucket of ice water. The designer of the bottles originally wanted to draw inspiration from the coca leaf or kola nut, but the local library didn’t have pictures of either. But he came up with the now iconic design of the Coca-Cola bottle after finding a picture of a cacao pod.
  • “Enormity” is often thought to mean enormous, but it actually means extreme evil. It can be used, however, to mean a gigantic amount of evil.
  • Remember the movie in which Sinbad played a genie called “Shazam?” Or reading the childhood books, “The Berenstein Bears” or even Curious George’s tail? Yeah … those actually never happened. At least, according to what people are calling The Mandela Effect, a phenomenon where many swear they remember something one way, but it’s actually different. By the way, there’s no record of the movie Shazam, the books we read as kids were actually the BerenstAin Bears, and Curious George does not have a tail, which suggests he’s an ape rather than a “little monkey,” as he’s called in books.
  • Eyes that are two different colors on a person is called Heterochromia. Some people mistakenly think David Bowie had this, but one of his pupils was permanently dilated his friend’s fingernail sliced his eye when they got into a fight as teenagers.
  • Mozart was so good at playing music at a young age, when he performed in London, people suspected him of being a drawf posing as a 9-year-old child.
  • Austrian actress Hedy Lamarr wanted to help the war effort during World War II and, with the help of composer George Antheil, developed wireless communications technology we still use today in everyday objects such as cell phones.
  • In “The Big Lebowski,” the word Dude is used 161 times and “man” is used 147.
  • No one really knows why sometimes we get the sensation of falling when we’re about to fall asleep. It’s called a hypnic jerk and one theory is it’s a leftover response from when humans used to sleep on branches in trees.
  • V for Victory was popularized by Winston Churchill during World War II. But it was first proposed as a symbol for resistance to tyranny by Victor de Laveleye who was exiled to England after the Nazi invasion of Belgium in 1940.
  • In case you ever wanted to kiss a baby iguana on the mouth, you might want to be aware that they often eat the poop of adult iguanas to get bacteria necessary for digesting their food.
  • George Orwell’s “1984,” written in 1949, shot to the top of Amazon Best-Sellers last week, which for those of you listening in the future was the second to last week of January 2017 following a number of references to the book on Twitter after Trump counselor Kellyanne Conway's statement that White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer used "alternative facts" when describing Inauguration Day.
  • If you see a representation of a pirate wearing an eye patch, it’s most likely not because he lost his eye -- a theory, which was deemed Plausible by “Mythbusters,” is that wearing an eye patch kept that eye’s pupil dilated so seeing in the dark was easier when the patch was removed. Having this skill was handy when pirates had to go below deck quickly.
  • Lincoln’s famous beard was grown because 11-year-old Grace Bedell of Westfield, New York, wrote him a letter suggesting growing a beard to hide his gaunt face before the upcoming presidential election. On the way to his inauguration, he made a special stop in Westfield to meet Bedell and, shaking her hand, said,“You see? I let these whiskers grow for you.”
  • As much as fans love him, Darth Vader only appears on screen for a total of 12 minutes in the original Star Wars.
  • Not that I recommend you try it, but Romans used to effectively whiten their teeth with urine.
  • There are two theories most probable about the origin of pink lemonade. Neither of them involve adding strawberry or raspberry to the mixture, as is common today and both involve the circus. One is that red cinnamon candies were accidentally dropped in a vat of lemonade in 1912 and, because there wasn’t enough time to make a new batch, the lemonade was sold and became a hit. The second is that a lemonade salesman at the circus in 1857 ran out of water to make lemonade and grabbed a tub of water that was previously used to wash a performer’s pink tights.

The role of Shirley Temple was played by Laura McClellan from The Productive Woman podcast, John Dennis was played by Danny Savage from the podcast Idiom Savant, and Stargate Pioneer from Better Podcasting played Abraham Lincoln.

Starting Thursday, The Story Behind will be doing more consecutive theme episodes starting with Forrest Gump February. Each episode will be the story behind a different pop culture or historical reference from the Tom Hanks movie. Be sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast app so you don’t miss an episode.

Follow The Story Behind: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website

Check out #PodernFamily on Twitter to find other great indie podcasts like this one.

If you enjoy podcasts about history, literature, archeology, and the arts, check out the hashtag #HumanitiesPodcasts on Twitter to find more podcasts like this one.

Click here to support this podcast on Patreon.

Media:

Music for Makers

Sources:

https://www.taskeasy.com/blog/2015/08/10/10-interesting-facts-about-grass/

http://facts.randomhistory.com/2008/12/15_monkeys.html

http://www.thekitchn.com/whats-the-difference-between-yams-and-sweet-potatoes-word-of-mouth-211176

http://www.livescience.com/38592-biggest-deserts.html

http://myths.e2bn.org/mythsandlegends/userstory20411-hades-vs-satan.html

http://mobile-cuisine.com/did-you-know/raisin-fun-facts/

http://www.wordcentral.com/cgi-bin/student?eclair

http://wonderopolis.org/wonder/how-does-an-eraser-work

http://www.women-inventors.com/Hedy-Lammar.asp

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=sycophant

http://www.rd.com/funny-stuff/funny-origins-behind-idioms-you-use-all-the-time/

https://www.buzzfeed.com/expresident/truly-surprising-word-origins?utm_term=.tu12gj6Me#.cjLVG2ax1

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/01/25/orwells-1984-leaps-top-amazon-bestseller-list/97031344/

http://mentalfloss.com/article/24479/5-things-you-didnt-know-about-shirley-temple

http://mashable.com/2014/01/25/dark-90s-songs/#1dNPs1ejkPqH

http://ohfact.com/interesting-facts-about-iguana/

https://www.bloomsbury-international.com/blog/2014/07/11/15-interesting-facts-about-the-english-language/

http://www.cracked.com/photoplasty_519_30-mind-blowing-true-facts-about-famous-movie-scenes/

http://listverse.com/2014/06/30/10-easy-questions-we-still-dont-know-the-answer-to/

http://www.snopes.com/cokelore/bottle.asp

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/the-58-most-commonly-misused-words-and-phrases-a6754551.html

https://www.buzzfeed.com/christopherhudspeth/crazy-examples-of-the-mandela-effect-that-will-make-you-ques?utm_term=.uqV0816Lg#.lln3R9qYK

http://scienceblogs.com/gregladen/2014/05/19/is-curious-george-an-ape-or-a-monkey/

http://www.allaboutvision.com/conditions/heterochromia.htm

http://mentalfloss.com/article/27273/nine-people-heterochromia-and-one-without

http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/top10facts/638180/Top-10-facts-Wolfgang-Amadeus-Mozart

http://www.thisdayinquotes.com/2011/01/origin-of-v-for-victory.html

http://mentalfloss.com/article/52493/why-did-pirates-wear-eye-patches
http://time.com/3462545/abraham-lincoln-beard/

http://io9.gizmodo.com/some-people-use-urine-and-chemistry-to-whiten-their-t-1662270403

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/unusual-origins-pink-lemonade-180960145/

 

Jan 26, 2017

This week’s theme was inspired by the title of my favorite song from Elton John, which is Mona Lisas and Mad Hatters. You don’t have to be familiar with the song to listen to the episodes, but if you haven’t, it’s one of the more underrated of his songs. On Monday, we talked about how the da Vinci painting wasn’t as famous until it was stolen in 1911 and how our mind tricks us into seeing Mona Lisa’s smile sometimes and other times, not as much.

In this episode, I’m getting into the second part of the Elton John song title. From unknown mercury poisoning in hat factories to the man known for inspiring the character in Lewis Carroll’s book “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” and through today, even though the actual occupational disease doesn’t occur anymore.

I’m your host, Emily Prokop, and this is The Story Behind Mad Hatters.

The role of Johnny Depp was played by Nick from The Epic Film Guys podcast.

Follow The Story Behind: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website

Check out #PodernFamily on Twitter to find other great indie podcasts like this one.

If you enjoy podcasts about history, literature, archeology, and the arts, check out the hashtag #HumanitiesPodcasts on Twitter to find more podcasts like this one.

Click here to support this podcast on Patreon.

Media:

Music for Makers

Sources:

http://www.cas.org/news/insights/science-connections/mad-hatter

http://www.medicinenet.com/mercury_poisoning/article.htm

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1550196/?page=1

http://www.naturalnews.com/016544.html

http://www.history.com/news/ask-history/where-did-the-phrase-mad-as-a-hatter-come-from

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/07/weekinreview/07ryan.html

http://www.the-tls.co.uk/articles/public/the-real-mad-hatter/

http://herocomplex.latimes.com/uncategorized/johnny-depp-explains-how-he-picked-his-poison-with-the-mad-hatter/

Jan 23, 2017

This week’s theme was inspired by the title of my favorite song from Elton John, which is Mona Lisas and Mad Hatters. You don’t have to be familiar with the song to listen to the episodes, but if you haven’t, it’s one of the more underrated of his songs. Naturally, we’re starting the week talking about the famous painting and the even more famous smile painted by Leonardo Da Vinci.

In this episode, we’ll be talking about the real-life woman in the painting, how the painting may have achieved its fame because of being stolen and why the smile on the painting’s subject is so mysterious.

I’m your host, Emily Prokop, and this is The Story Behind The Mona Lisa

The role of Luc Maspero was played by Fee from The Ultra Podcast.

Follow The Story Behind: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website

Check out #PodernFamily on Twitter to find other great indie podcasts like this one.

If you enjoy podcasts about history, literature, archeology, and the arts, check out the hashtag #HumanitiesPodcasts on Twitter to find more podcasts like this one.

Click here to support this podcast on Patreon.

Media:

Music for Makers

Sources:

http://mentalfloss.com/article/62280/14-things-you-didnt-know-about-mona-lisa

http://www.ibtimes.com/why-mona-lisa-so-famous-310480

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/stolen-how-the-mona-lisa-became-the-worlds-most-famous-painting-16406234/

http://www.louvre.fr/en/oeuvre-notices/mona-lisa-portrait-lisa-gherardini-wife-francesco-del-giocondo

http://www.history.com/news/ask-history/who-posed-for-leonardo-da-vincis-mona-lisa

https://news.artnet.com/art-world/secret-behind-mona-lisa-smile-discovered-326770

http://www.ibtimes.com/why-mona-lisa-so-famous-310480

http://www.livescience.com/4648-25-secrets-mona-lisa-revealed.html

http://www.livescience.com/32483-why-does-mona-lisas-smile-change.html

Jan 19, 2017

Today’s episode is the second in a two-part series of The Story Behind. The subject of these two episodes couldn’t be contained into just one show. We’ll be celebrating her 95th birthday, which was on Tuesday, January 17th, by dedicating this week to her contribution to television, Hollywood and her various charity works.

In the previous episode, we talked about about her early days in radio and television; her awards and critics; and her title as the First Lady of Game Shows.

In this episode, we’ll be talking about the roles she’s probably best known for, her incredible love of animals and her charity work, and her recent return to the spotlight because of a simple Snickers commercial.

I’m your host, Emily Prokop, and this is The Story Behind Betty White | Part 2: The Later Years.

Follow The Story Behind: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website

Check out #PodernFamily on Twitter to find other great indie podcasts like this one.

If you enjoy podcasts about history, literature, archeology, and the arts, check out the hashtag #HumanitiesPodcasts on Twitter to find more podcasts like this one.

Click here to support this podcast on Patreon.

Media:

Music for Makers

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXL8QPWLbBo

Sources:

http://mentalfloss.com/article/61054/15-things-you-didnt-know-about-betty-white

http://www.biography.com/people/betty-white-9542614#early-life-and-career

http://www.biography.com/people/betty-white-9542614/videos/betty-white-mini-biography-42155247

http://www.biography.com/people/betty-white-9542614/videos/betty-white-hollywoods-golden-girl-3945539701

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/gossip/betty-white-charlie-sheen-lindsay-lohan-ungrateful-actors-abuse-fame-article-1.111942

http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/05/betty-white-facts/

https://www.metv.com/lists/9-things-we-bet-you-never-knew-about-betty-white

http://www.avclub.com/article/how-ithe-mary-tyler-moore-showi-reinvented-the-sit-99172

http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/golden-girls-turns-30-facts-series/story?id=33545250

https://metv.com/lists/11-things-you-might-not-know-about-mamas-family

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXL8QPWLbBo

https://medium.com/@traceylross/30-years-later-the-golden-girls-is-still-the-most-progressive-show-on-television-b63aadd2edec#.8klg5jbd6

http://variety.com/2017/tv/news/hulu-golden-girls-streaming-blackish-1201954868/

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/betty-white-on-her-love-for-animals-92610121/

http://www.animalliberationfront.com/Saints/Actors/BettyWhite.htm

http://www.snopes.com/2016/12/28/gofundme-protecting-betty-white-from-2016/ 

Jan 16, 2017

This week’s episodes will be a two-part series of The Story Behind. The subject of these two episodes just couldn’t be contained into just one show. So we’ll be celebrating her 95th birthday on Tuesday, January 17th, by dedicating this week to her contribution to television, Hollywood and her various charity works.

In this episode, we’ll be talking about her early days in radio and television; her awards and, surprisingly, her critics; and her title as the First Lady of Game Shows.

I’m your host, Emily Prokop, and this is The Story Behind Betty White | Part 1: The Early Years.

The role of John Crosby was played by Daniel Repholz from The Toe on the Trigger podcast.

Follow The Story Behind: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website

Check out #PodernFamily on Twitter to find other great indie podcasts like this one.

If you enjoy podcasts about history, literature, archeology, and the arts, check out the hashtag #HumanitiesPodcasts on Twitter to find more podcasts like this one.

Click here to support this podcast on Patreon.

Media:

Music for Makers

Sources:

http://mentalfloss.com/article/61054/15-things-you-didnt-know-about-betty-white

http://www.biography.com/people/betty-white-9542614#early-life-and-career

http://www.biography.com/people/betty-white-9542614/videos/betty-white-mini-biography-42155247

http://www.biography.com/people/betty-white-9542614/videos/betty-white-hollywoods-golden-girl-3945539701

http://blog.wfmu.org/freeform/2010/04/the-early-betty-white.html 

http://gameshows.about.com/od/hostprofiles/tp/Betty-White-The-First-Lady-Of-Game-Shows.htm

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/gossip/betty-white-charlie-sheen-lindsay-lohan-ungrateful-actors-abuse-fame-article-1.111942

http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/05/betty-white-facts/

https://www.nwhm.org/blog/throwbackthursday-the-first-ladies-of-game-shows/

https://www.metv.com/lists/9-things-we-bet-you-never-knew-about-betty-white

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=__4jVZQ6PIg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7k23zM-eLoI

 

 

Jan 12, 2017

Whether you like them sweet or salty, dipped in frosting or mustard, or even if you prefer hard over soft, the snack food we talk about in this episode continues to be a favorite around the world. And, I don’t know about you, but I know it’s tough to pass the kiosk at the mall for these delicious treats without the scent of them tempting me to break every diet I’m ever on.

In this episode, we’ll talk about the religious meaning and origins of these snacks; the different incarnations of them spawned by accidents; and how they’ve become associated with luck, marriage and even helped thwart the attempts of invasion.

I’m your host, Emily Prokop, and this is The Story Behind Pretzels.

Follow The Story Behind: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website

Check out #PodernFamily on Twitter to find other great indie podcasts like this one.

If you enjoy podcasts about history, literature, archeology, and the arts, check out the hashtag #HumanitiesPodcasts on Twitter to find more podcasts like this one.

Click here to support this podcast on Patreon.

Media:

Music for Makers

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=khTS0cU2IgQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yMe7mlRv8UE

Sources:

http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/06/the-history-of-pretzels/

http://www.history.com/news/hungry-history/the-pretzel-a-twisted-history

http://wonderopolis.org/wonder/how-did-the-pretzel-get-its-shape

http://www.kitchenproject.com/history/Pretzel.htm

http://www.germanfoodguide.com/pretzel.cfm

http://recipes.howstuffworks.com/pretzel-facts.htm

 

http://articles.latimes.com/2002/jan/14/news/mn-22490

Jan 9, 2017

When this episode comes out, it’ll be the second week of the new year. So … how’s everyone’s diets going? If you’re looking for some motivation, you might want to go back to last week’s episode on The Story Behind the Treadmill because in this episode, we’ll be talking about a certain crunchy, salty, fatty food that’s hard to resist.

Find out the popular origin story of this food, and how it’s actually just a legend; how it became a favorite snack food and went from banned during World War 2 to becoming labeled “essential; and why you can’t just eat one.

I’m your host, Emily Prokop, and this is The Story Behind Potato Chips.

Follow The Story Behind: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website

Check out #PodernFamily on Twitter to find other great indie podcasts like this one.

If you enjoy podcasts about history, literature, archeology, and the arts, check out the hashtag #HumanitiesPodcasts on Twitter to find more podcasts like this one.

Click here to support this podcast on Patreon.

Media:

Music for Makers

Sources:

http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2014/09/real-story-potato-chip/

http://www.snopes.com/business/origins/chips.asp

http://www.foxnews.com/food-drink/2016/03/14/surprising-history-potato-chips.html

http://invention.si.edu/potato-chip-inventions

https://www.tastemade.com/articles/8-potato-chip-facts-you-cant-stop-popping

http://www.eatthis.com/this-why-its-so-hard-stop-eating-chips

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/philosophy-stirred-not-shaken/201404/can-you-really-become-addicted-potato-chips

http://list25.com/25-unique-potato-chip-flavors-from-around-the-world-you-probably-never-heard-of/

https://books.google.com/books?id=Wq3tvL_uIHcC&pg=PA637&lpg=PA637&dq=potato+chips+world+war+2&source=bl&ots=M-osSWeaM-&sig=XYGclCKkgQSCqEPY0Jz6dNq_Nq8&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwibvc7fzZXRAhVDw4MKHbVfASEQ6AEIbTAU#v=onepage&q=potato%20chips%20world%20war%202&f=false

Jan 5, 2017

Emily's evil twin, Erica, crashes the podcast for this episode! Luckily, Dr. Drake Ramoray, her long-lost brother, who came out of his coma AND recovered from amnesia, was there to save the day and the show!

Only a show on the topic of soap operas could handle such a dramatic introduction. Find out how soap operas came to exist, their rise and fall in popularity, and why they look different from other television shows.

I'm your host, Emily Prokop (or is it Erica???), and this is The Story Behind Soap Operas.

Follow The Story Behind: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website

Thanks again to Craig from The Ultra Podcast for coming in an saving the day as Dr. Drake Ramoray, our not-so-subtle nod to our love of "Friends."

Check out #PodernFamily on Twitter to find other great indie podcasts like this one.

If you enjoy podcasts about history, literature, archeology, and the arts, check out the hashtag #HumanitiesPodcasts on Twitter to find more podcasts like this one.

Click here to support this podcast on Patreon.

Media:

Music for Makers

Sources:

http://www.museum.tv/eotv/soapopera.htm

http://entertainment.howstuffworks.com/11-longest-running-daytime-soap-operas.htm

https://www.otrcat.com/soap-operas-during-the-golden-age-of-radio

http://mentalfloss.com/article/25169/why-did-soap-operas-look-different-other-tv-shows

https://books.google.com/books?id=YPlPfU9KSGMC&pg=PA264&lpg=PA264&dq=soap+opera+history&source=bl&ots=b4ZMbc0J1-&sig=rLlRhJob1ySuulq43tQjZZ1Gkg8&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjPheq09YzRAhXEWSYKHf-gD044ChDoAQhEMAc#v=onepage&q=soap%20opera%20history&f=false

http://www.toptenz.net/top-10-soap-opera-cliches.php

Jan 2, 2017

Happy New Year! Are you ready to make this year the best year of your life? Are you going to get off the couch, throw out those Christmas cookies, join the gym, and get that heart beating?! Well, what are you waiting for!?

I bet you’re at the gym right now, about to step on the machine we’ll be talking about in this episode! Get ready to learn about how you’re about to use a machine that went from its beginnings as a human-powered heavy-lifter to a form of prison punishment to becoming the most popular piece of cardiovascular exercise machinery.

I’m your host, Emily Prokop, and this is The Story Behind The Treadmill!

Follow The Story Behind: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website

Check out #PodernFamily on Twitter to find other great indie podcasts like this one.

If you enjoy podcasts about history, literature, archeology, and the arts, check out the hashtag #HumanitiesPodcasts on Twitter to find more podcasts like this one.

Click here to support this podcast on Patreon.

Media:

Music for Makers

Sources:

https://www.lifefitness.com/blog/posts/the-history-of-the-treadmill.html

http://mentalfloss.com/article/12275/treadmill-originated-prisons

https://physicalculturestudy.com/2015/04/01/a-brief-history-of-the-treadmill/

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/blogs/secretlife/blogposts/retroscience-original-treadmill/

http://www.livestrong.com/article/324355-the-history-of-aerobics/

http://www.cooperaerobics.com/Health-Tips/Prevention-Plus/Trusting-the-Treadmill-Stress-Test.aspx

http://www.topconsumerreviews.com/treadmills/article-popular.php

Dec 29, 2016

You may be seeing a lot of social media posts from people reflecting on 2016 or even saying “good riddance” to the year, looking forward to a new year. And you may already have heard people discussing their new year’s resolutions or plans for 2017. One of the biggest celebrations happens annually in New York City, as many gather to watch a giant lit up ball descend as they countdown to midnight.

In this episode, we’ll talk about why we celebrate the new year when we do, how it’s celebrated around the world, and the famed ball drop in Times Square.

I’m your host, Emily Prokop, and this is The Story Behind New Year’s Eve.

Have a safe and happy new year!

Follow The Story Behind: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website

Check out #PodernFamily on Twitter to find other great indie podcasts like this one.

If you enjoy podcasts about history, literature, archeology, and the arts, check out the hashtag #HumanitiesPodcasts on Twitter to find more podcasts like this one.

Click here to support this podcast on Patreon.

Media:

Music for Makers

Sources:

https://www.timeout.com/newyork/blog/10-insider-tips-for-doing-times-square-on-new-years-eve-123015

http://www.timessquarenyc.org/events/new-years-eve/about-the-new-years-eve-ball/history-of-the-new-years-eve-ball/index.aspx#.WE7ruvn491k

http://mentalfloss.com/article/60828/story-behind-times-squares-new-years-eve-celebration

http://www.today.com/money/new-year-s-eve-ball-5-little-known-facts-about-t64546

http://old.post-gazette.com/tv/20011226guy1226p6.asp

http://www.history.com/topics/holidays/new-years

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_ball

http://www.history.com/news/6-things-you-may-not-know-about-the-gregorian-calendar

http://www.infoplease.com/spot/history-of-august.html

http://thepossumdrop.com/Information.html

Dec 26, 2016

When Australian comedic Band Axis of Awesome created a YouTube hit in 2011 with their song, “Four Chords,” many were amazed to realize just how many songs used the same chord progression. If you haven’t heard the song in it’s entirety, I encourage you to take a listen. 

LINK TO Axis of Awesome’s “4 Chords”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oOlDewpCfZQ

In this episode, we’ll talk about why it’s possible to sing a number of different songs using the same four chords, why these four chords sound so good to our ears, and hopefully when this episode is over, you will continue to listen to podcasts instead of the radio, since you already know what most of the songs sound like.

I’m your host, Emily Prokop, and this is The Story Behind the Four Chords.

Follow The Story Behind: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website

Check out #PodernFamily on Twitter to find other great indie podcasts like this one.

Click here to support this podcast on Patreon.

Media:

Music for Makers

Pachelbel’s Canon

Axis of Awesome - 4 Chords

Four Chord Progression and Sensitive Female Chord Progression

Sources:

http://www.easyeartraining.com/learn/four-chords-and-the-truth/#

http://wmbriggs.com/post/2641/

http://web.archive.org/web/20100113080032/http://www.boston.com/ae/music/articles/2008/12/31/striking_a_chord/

http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/music/2015/01/14/country-music-mash-up-luke-bryan-blake-shelton-florida-georgia-line/21751561/

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/ThreeChordsAndTheTruth

http://www.sciencefriday.com/articles/why-do-songs-get-stuck-in-our-heads/

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/science/science-news/9950143/Get-that-tune-out-of-your-head-scientists-find-how-to-get-rid-of-earworms.html

http://archive.boston.com/ae/music/articles/2008/12/31/striking_a_chord/

http://www.tdpri.com/threads/thought-of-the-day-on-chord-progressions.487939/

Dec 22, 2016

This episode is a bit different from regular episodes of The Story Behind. Instead of one topic, I explore the story behind five different Christmas traditions, some from history and some more modern. This was originally recorded for a guest segment I did on the Triple X-Mas Special episode of Everyone Has a Podcast, a comedy show hosted by my friends Adam and Bryon.

I’m your host, Emily Prokop, and this is The Story Behind Christmas Traditions.

Follow The Story Behind: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website

Check out #PodernFamily on Twitter to find other great indie podcasts like this one.

Click here to support this podcast on Patreon.

Media:

FreeXmasMP3.com

Sources:

Snopes.com

Alltogetherchristmas.com

Gizmodo.com

Achristmasstoryhouse.com

Dec 19, 2016

We've seen them on TV, most notably on daytime shows like Maury, catching cheaters and making for over-dramatic television. But if lie detectors are so good? Why aren't they used in actual criminal cases?

In this episode, we'll talk about the invention of the lie detector test, how it works and even how to pass a lie detector test.

I’m your host, Emily Prokop, and this is The Story Behind the Polygraph.

Follow The Story Behind: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website

Check out #PodernFamily on Twitter to find other great indie podcasts like this one.

Special thanks to Jim Collison from Home Gadget Geeks at TheAverageGuy.TV, who played my polygraph tester in this episode.

Click here to support this podcast on Patreon.

Media:

Music for Makers

Sources:

http://www.kidzone.ws/science/polygraph/historyofthepolygraphmachine.htm

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-22467640

http://americacomesalive.com/2014/11/08/invention-polygraph/

http://www.engineersgarage.com/invention-stories/lie-detector-history

http://www.apa.org/research/action/polygraph.aspx

https://www.hg.org/article.asp?id=31737

http://www.criminaldefenselawyer.com/resources/criminal-defense/defendants-rights/lie-detector-test.htm#

http://www.livescience.com/33512-pass-lie-detector-polygraph.html

http://www.npr.org/2014/10/27/359078315/the-man-behind-wonder-woman-was-inspired-by-both-suffragists-and-centerfolds

http://home.total.net/~galcar/html/brief_history_of_the_polygraph.html

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=polygraph

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/02/04/the-polygraph-has-been-lying-for-90-years.html

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-02-02/will-lie-detectors-ever-get-their-day-in-court-again-

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/LieDetector

https://books.google.com/books?id=QI0S4XhXJ9wC&pg=PA146&lpg=PA146&dq=Tony+Grignano+and+Cecil+Loniello&source=bl&ots=6LQ7Kd1bLN&sig=744rNkcgzT-VU1V4udK5qMO5D38&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiQoeGuoODQAhUB1mMKHXF7CrAQ6AEIVjAM#v=onepage&q=Tony%20Grignano%20and%20Cecil%20Loniello&f=false

Dec 15, 2016

For anyone who has been pregnant or has been around someone who is pregnant, you may be familiar with the amazing phenomenon of the swelling of appendages you never knew could swell so much. Being pregnant myself, there are days when someone will ask me how I’m feeling and all I do is show them a comparison of my swollen feet and ankles to those of a certain popular ‘80s doll, whose toes are only distinguishable by the thin thread separating them.

In this episode, we’ll be talking about the disputed creator of that doll, how the craze for this doll took off, and how Black Fridays of today can’t hold a candle to the violence and mania that ensued in the early-to-mid 1980s.

I’m your host, Emily Prokop, and this is The Story Behind Cabbage Patch Kids.

Follow The Story Behind: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website

Check out #PodernFamily on Twitter to find other great indie podcasts like this one.

Click here to support this podcast on Patreon.

Media:

Music for Makers

PIX News 11: https://youtu.be/VaQuxCWWTaI

Sources:

http://www.vice.com/video/the-secret-history-of-cabbage-patch-kids-011

http://www.glamour.com/story/cabbage-patch-kids-facts

http://content.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,921419,00.html

https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=861&dat=19831127&id=LzMcAAAAIBAJ&sjid=3VgEAAAAIBAJ&pg=5445,7789961

http://archives.timesleader.com/1998/1998_21/1998_11_27_THE_MEMORIES_OF_A_DOLL_RIOT_VETERAN_SCARS_LINGER_FROM__83_CABBAG.html

http://www.babylandgeneral.com/about/our-history/

https://books.google.com/books?id=mbTUorcuXkoC&pg=PA51&lpg=PA51&dq=atlanta+weekly+xavier+roberts&source=bl&ots=uu2r8Ut1oV&sig=rC7_iRO9D5iijajKaHo5aTTqbHg&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjm1Kj7kdPQAhUi64MKHWCaC60Q6AEIQjAH#v=onepage&q=atlanta%20weekly%20xavier%20roberts&f=false

Dec 12, 2016

With the birth of our second child coming in April, we’ve been going through a lot of my daughter’s toys to see what we can pass on, and there’s one bin of toys we know will be always be shared by her, our future son, as well as my husband and me.

In fact, we’re not quite sure which of these toys belonged to my husband when he was growing up and which ones are brand new, since they transcend generations and are robust enough to survive multiple children.

In this episode, we’ll talk about the man behind this toy, how his family has been behind production up through this day, and how this toy has impacted generations of children, past and present. And as awesome as they are for children’s development and creativity, there’s nothing worse than stepping on one with barefeet.

I’m your host, Emily Prokop, and this is The Story Behind LEGO.

The role of Ole Kirk Christainsen was played by Kevin from Who Are These Podcasts?

Follow The Story Behind: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website

Check out #PodernFamily on Twitter to find other great indie podcasts like this one.

Click here to support this podcast on Patreon.

Sources:

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/the-lego-legacy/

http://mentalfloss.com/article/19400/early-history-lego

http://www.famousinventors.org/ole-kirk-christiansen

https://www.lego.com/en-us/aboutus/news-room/2016/april/smooth-handover-to-the-next-generation

https://www.lego.com/en-us/aboutus/lego-group/the_lego_history

http://www.dailycelebrations.com/120401.htm

http://www.toyhalloffame.org/toys/lego

http://www.inc.com/ilan-mochari/lego-healing-creative-power.html

http://outsidethebrick.com/blog/2013/07/10benefitspart1/

Dec 8, 2016

Have you ever seen a human-like robot, doll or animatronic that was so lifelike it gave you the creeps? Maybe you feel uncomfortable seeing a clown or zombie but don’t know why. The uneasiness you may feel is known as the Uncanny Valley Phenomenon, which is noticeable when something is so close to being human, but lacks a certain something that’s hard to describe. If you saw the robot from the 1986 movie, “Short Circuit,” your brain would process it as just a regular robot and it wouldn’t set off any warning bells in your mind. But the more scientists try to add human features to a robot, the more negatively we respond to it.

This uncanny valley is why some people say they feel uncomfortable in wax museums. The characters are so incredibly lifelike, yet there’s something just off enough about them, our brains process them as being something to fear. Yet, wax museums have been popular tourist attractions for years. And it was one woman who became so skilled at her wax sculptures, her museums have attracted guests for more than 250 years.

I’m your host, Emily Prokop, and this is The Story Behind Madame Tussaud.

Follow The Story Behind: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website

Check out #PodernFamily on Twitter to find other great indie podcasts like this one.

Click here to support this podcast on Patreon.

Media:

Music for Makers

Sources:

http://www.cnn.com/2012/07/11/health/uncanny-valley-robots/

http://www.encyclopedia.com/people/literature-and-arts/european-art-1600-present-biographies/marie-tussaud

http://mentalfloss.com/article/25496/10-things-you-might-not-know-about-madame-tussauds-wax-museum

https://www.madametussauds.com/hollywood/en/about/about-us/

http://www.historytoday.com/richard-cavendish/death-madame-tussaud

https://ridiculouslyinteresting.com/2012/11/27/burnt-and-melted-wax-figures-after-the-1925-fire-at-madame-tussauds-in-london/

Dec 5, 2016

There are lots of experiments that have come and gone. And not just experiments you’ll find in science laboratories or chemistry classes.

For example, if you were around for the early days of Facebook, back when it was known as “THE Facebook,” you might remember the slogan “a social experiment.” But it wasn’t the first social experiment, and it certain won’t be the last. Prohibition, otherwise known as a constitutional ban on the making and selling of alcoholic beverages, was known as the Noble Experiment from 1920-1933.

It’s safe to say the experiment failed, considering many lost their jobs, restaurants and clubs were put out of business, and prohibition gave way to corruption and an increase in underground crime, not to mention an exorbitant amount of power wielded to mobsters and bootleggers like Al Capone.

Jello Biafra of the Dead Kennedys once said, "For every prohibition you create, you also create an underground."

I’m your host, Emily Prokop, and this is The Story Behind Speakeasies.

Follow The Story Behind: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website

Check out #PodernFamily on Twitter to find other great indie podcasts like this one.

The role of Jello Biafra was played by Mark from the Unskippable podcast, and Eleanor Roosevelt was played by Tammy Terwelp, General Manager of 91.5 KRCC, Southern Colorado's NPR Station.

Click here to support this podcast on Patreon.

Media:

Music for Makers

Sources:

http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/j/jello_biafra.html

http://www.history.com/news/hungry-history/prohibition-speakeasies-and-finger-foods

http://www.legendsofamerica.com/ah-prohibitionspeakeasy.html

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2268971/Inside-speakeasies-1920s-The-hidden-drinking-spots-transformed-New-York-Citys-night-life-prohibition-era-beyond.html

http://www.blackpast.org/aah/cotton-club-harlem-1923

https://www.thrillist.com/drink/nation/secret-bars-hard-to-find-speakeasies

http://www.legendsofamerica.com/20th-gangsters.html

https://parachute.mapquest.com/2016/03/16/five-hardest-speakeasies-to-get-into/

http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1085.html

Dec 1, 2016

Many around my age remember talking to our friends on AOL Instant Messenger after school and using netspeak for things like LOL or JK or BRB for Laughing Out Loud, Just Kidding or Be Right Back, which no one really does anymore with the internet.

But every generation has a way of shortening their writing, it seems. Decades ago, high-schoolers took classes on a way of writing called shorthand, which was used in offices for dictation, for reporters taking notes at a quick pace and court reporters transcribing the proceedings. But, sometimes even court reporters couldn’t write shorthand quickly enough to keep up with fast-talkers, and, as seen in all great infomercials, someone said, “There’s Got To Be A Better Way!”

I’m your host, Emily Prokop, and this is The Story Behind Stenomasks.

Follow The Story Behind: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website

Check out #PodernFamily on Twitter to find other great indie podcasts like this one.

The role of Pappy Ward was played by Adam from Everyone has a Podcast.

Click here to support this podcast on Patreon.

Media:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hxVQ9rhjyTY

Music for Makers

Sources:

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-34603886

https://talktech.com/history/

http://www.phillycourtreporters.com/the-stenomask-your-court-reporting-nighmares-realized/

http://www.lrb.co.uk/v30/n23/leah-price/diary

http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/08/06/a-brief-history-of-shorthand/

http://pitmania.com/shorthand-deathmatch-pitman-v-gregg-2/

http://sixminutes.dlugan.com/speaking-rate/

Nov 28, 2016

Yelp Review: 1 Star
"If I could give zero to this collection of 'Merican phat pants ice cream zoo I would. This is a disgrace to the park system. Don’t go here. Stay in the hills or badlands instead. I do not think it is patriotic to deface a mountain. Also the surrounding towns are horrible. I am pretty sure that the next gathering of the juggalos is taking place around here somewhere."

Yelp Review: 1 Star
"Not to downplay the achievements of the monument ... but, it was really not that awesome. Seriously, you can only look at giant heads carved into the side of a mountain for so long. We drove across the country and through South Dakota for this?"

Yelp Review: 1 Star
"not very good. kind of scary imo. my little sister cried. do NOT bring kids to this thing."

Despite the one-star Yelp reviews, this South Dakota monument attracts more than 2 million tourists per year, became a sought-after movie backdrop by Alfred Hitchcock, which caused rumors and controversy with the National Parks Service, and started off with a 14-year construction using nearly 400 men and women.

I’m your host, Emily Prokop, and this is The Story Behind Mount Rushmore.

Follow The Story Behind: Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website

The One-Star Yelp Reviews were read by Adam and Bryon from Everyone has a Podcast and Porter from Porter’s Podcast.

The role of Bill Challis was played byRich Grimshaw, a forensic engineer from Cumming, Georgia. Brandon from the Basement Condition Podcast played Gutzon Borglum, and Podcast Rob from The Something-Something Cast played Alfred Hitchcock.

Check out #PodernFamily on Twitter to find other great indie podcasts like this one.

Click here to support this podcast on Patreon.

Media:

Music for Makers

Sources:

http://www.history.com/topics/us-presidents/mount-rushmore

http://www.rosyinn.com/1320a1.html

http://www-tc.pbs.org/nationalparks/media/pdfs/untold_stories_mount_rushmore.pdf

https://www.nps.gov/moru/learn/historyculture/carving-history.htm

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/primary-resources/rushmore-north-northwest/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Rushmore_in_popular_culture

http://ghostsnghouls.com/2013/10/04/mount-rushmore-haunted/

http://www.azquotes.com/author/50630-Gutzon_Borglum

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/biography/rushmore-borglum/

https://www.yelp.com/biz/mount-rushmore-national-memorial-keystone-2?

1 2 Next »